I’ve been wanting to gain some more proficiency in D3.js. I went through several tutorials at some point in 2016, but I really needed a project to work on. More recently, I’ve become interested in Citibike data, specifically, the patterns of available bikes at given locations. Why not graph it?

Citibike maintains a comprehensive dataset of all trip data, but does not seem to maintain a historical dataset for stations. So, I hacked together a python script1 to gather some historical data from the station near my apartment.

I’m a total D3 neophyte, so I found a sample multi-series line chart that I could use to start viewing the data I collected. I hacked another script1 to transform the data into something that would be easier to chart.

After a bit of modification to the sample chart, I got this:

A Bad Line Chart

It looks cool, but it’s really not what I was going for, and it’s pretty useless.

After some more work, I’m getting closer:

A Slightly Less Bad Chart

…but, it still needs a lot of work. Specifically, the x-axis labels are worthless. Also, I really don’t have enough data there to show what I want to show. I think I need at least 30 days as opposed to the 7 I currently have. It doesn’t help that the system was closed for a couple of those days due to winter weather.

I’ll check back in a couple weeks to see how it is shaping up.

1The scripts referenced in this post are available at github.com/jpreardon/citibike-station-status.

This inaugural dinner set the bar quite high for future hosts. For this delicious taste of Catalonia, Dario pulled out all the stops. He even purchased some Spanish style wine glasses. It was like Barcelona… in Brooklyn.

Chorizo, manchego & valdeon cheeses, and olives
Yzaguirre Blanco Reserva Vermouth Spritzer

Warm Spanish Style Giant Bean Salad and Fire Roasted Peppers with Boquerones
Avinyó Cava Reserva, 2013

Almejas con Chorizo
La Caña Alberiño, 2015

Catalan Beef Stew with Mushrooms and Patatas Bravas
Camins del Priorat, 2015

Crema Catalana
Rare Wine Co. Historic Series Charleston Special Madeira

Chef(s): Dario & Matt
Photographer: Angela

If you are designing a web site, and you are considering overriding the browser’s shortcut to the find on page function, please reconsider. Control + F launches a familiar function in most browsers, users that use it expect to find a text string on the current page, not something else.

I hadn’t seen this done until it caught me by surprise on the community section of the letsencrypt.org site. Here’s what happens when one presses CTRL + F:

CTRL-F Override

The first press launches the site’s search form, the second press closes the site’s search form and open’s the browser’s search form. In my case, Google search had already done the heavy lifting by sending me to a text-dense page. Now I wanted to find my search term on that page, but I was thwarted by the site’s override of a browser function.

Enough people have wanted to do this that there are a few questions about how to override the browser’s find function with javascript on Stackoverflow. Like I said at the top, if you are thinking about implementing this sort of thing on your site, please reconsider.

This is a continuation from a tweet that needs more than 140 characters.

Dave doesn’t think that Trump’s supporters know that his cabinet nominees are bankers and billionaires. He goes on to suggest that we should be running ads on Fox news so those supporters can have a better understanding of who these nominees are.

I think this is a great idea, and I don’t think we should stop there. Why not run ads in other places likely to be seen by Trump supporters, like Facebook. Targeted ads aren’t an original idea, political campaigns have used them to reach their supporters, and attempt to chip away at their opponent’s supporters. This, however, could be different. It wouldn’t be part of a particular campaign and it could be used to put forth well cited facts. Something that attempts to counter the sensational headlines that spread alternative facts.