This is the current house bread here. It’s a half-recipe of Carey Nershi’s No-Knead Sandwich Bread with a couple minor tweaks. The whole wheat and rye flours make for a fairly dense loaf that works well for sandwiches and toasts. There’s usually a sliced loaf in the freezer. When there are only a couple slices left, it’s time to make another loaf.

Given the rise times, it won’t be ready quickly. However, after the experience of a couple loafs, the active time is quite minimal and can be worked in somewhere during the week. I usually mix it on a weekend morning while making coffee.

  • 216g Bread flour
  • 109g Whole wheat flour
  • 108g Dark rye flour
  • 3g Active dry yeast
  • 7g Salt
  • 8g Caraway seeds
  • 354g Water
  1. Mix dry ingredients in a large bowl.
  2. Add water and mix with hand into a shaggy dough ball.
  3. Cover and let rise for 5-6 hours at room temperature1.
  4. Butter a loaf pan.
  5. Turn dough out onto a floured work surface, it will be very wet.
  6. Add some flour to the top and pat down with hands.
  7. Using a dough scraper, fold the dough over onto itself a couple times.
  8. Roll into log shape that will fit into the loaf pan.
  9. Place in pan seam side down. Sprinkle top with a bit of flour.
  10. Cover and let rise for about an hour or so, until it has doubled in size.
  11. Preheat oven to 450º F.
  12. Slash top with a sharp knife and cook for 25-30 minutes (watch that the top doesn’t burn).
  13. Carefully turn out of pan immediately and let cook completely on wire rack before slicing.

1 After the initial rise, dough can be kept in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks until ready to bake. If using refrigerated dough, expect the second rise to take a bit longer.

Brian X. Chen writes that It’s Time to Stop Paying for a VPN. I think he’s right, especially given that some VPN providers may be owned by less-than-trustworthy parties. For a time, I was using iVPN, which still seems to be a reasonable choice. However, when my subscription lapsed, I didn’t renew. My motivation to use a VPN just wasn’t as strong as it once was.

For those that still need a VPN, self-hosting is an interesting option. The article mentions Algo, which looks straightforward and well documented. I haven’t tried it out myself, but if I feel the need to for a VPN in the future, I might opt for Algo over a commercial provider.